Aptera charge ports

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Aptera charge ports

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Aptera charge ports

  • Aptera charge ports

     Carl Knapp Knapp updated 1 month ago 15 Members · 25 Posts
  • Chris Merriott

    Member
    August 23, 2022 at 7:17 pm

    I noticed in their latest videos they show only a Tesla charge port behind the license plate. Is it known whether they plan to put other ports there? I know their FAQ page alludes to this, but it doesn’t appear any more ports would be able to fit alongside the Tesla port and remain hidden behind the license plate. Also, we aren’t even certain that we’d be able to utilize the Tesla grid at this point. Seems prudent to add CCS at least. Anyway, thoughts?

  • Vernon Sinnott

    Member
    August 23, 2022 at 7:40 pm

    Since it could be charged overnight on a standard 110 volt plug that should be included too.

    • kerbe2705

      Member
      August 23, 2022 at 9:49 pm

      @Vernon SINNOTT Whatever automotive power port Aptera chooses to install, it will be able to accept standard US line voltage. The male connectors on the power cable don’t have to be identical to one another: The vehicle end can be a Tesla connector or a J1772 while the end that goes into the wall receptacle can be NEMA 5-15 (grounded 2-blade, 110-120V) or NEMA 14-50 (grounded 3-blade, 220-240V) or whatever adapter you choose to use.

  • Dennis Swaney

    Member
    August 23, 2022 at 8:28 pm

    Chris, you may want to read the numerous previous posts on that subject; it has been discussed ad nauseum.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Dennis Swaney.
    • Chris Merriott

      Member
      August 24, 2022 at 1:53 pm

      I realize this, but I would’ve thought that with the gamma reveal they’d have shown their intentions with plug ports. Perhaps they’ll do so at Fully Charged?

  • kerbe2705

    Member
    August 23, 2022 at 9:42 pm

    @Chris Merriott Actually, the latest video showed only a hole where a charge port would be…

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    August 24, 2022 at 6:18 am

    It has to be one or the other, it would be overly complicated to do both. In spite of Aptera’s desire to use Tesla’s connector, a sentiment I agree with, it’s hard to imagine that they will be able to do that. They are building the gamma’s now and they still haven’t announced an agreement with Tesla. To use the Tesla connector they need to be able to buy the components, available only from Tesla, and they need to be able to use the Supercharger network which means the need to implement Tesla’s protocol so that they will be able to integrate there cars into Tesla’s payment system. Chris’s campaign to make Tesla the standard was clearing aimed at getting Elon’s attention, I don’t think he’s succeeded. If he had you would have thought that there would have been an announcement of some sort. Maybe we’ll hear something soon but we are entering the last quarter of the year, that’s not a lot of time to get things working before the launch at the end of the year or the start of next year. At some point they’ll have to hold their noses and use CCS1 as ugly as that connector is and as f**ked up as the CCS networks are.

    • George Hughes

      Member
      August 27, 2022 at 11:54 pm

      I think it is a forgone conclusion that Aptera will use a Tesla plug for a couple of reasons beyond those enumerated by Chris.

      First is the likely development of wide-ranging use of Tesla batteries/stations/vehicles in Musk’s energy venture in which users can earn probably charging credit from power companies. Tesla is poised for that eventuality because of its plug is natively capable of two-way power exchanges allowing the vehicle battery to be used to connect to the grid and potentially one’s home in the event of a power outage. My understanding is this is easier to accomplish with Tesla’s plug and possibly a software update.

      Second, anyone can sign up for and, from what I read, can gain access to Tesla charging stations for $0.99 cents a month for a reduced rate or, for a premium, one can charge at a Tesla fast charger by appearing with a car capable of being charged at a Tesla station.

      The videos from Chris are/were designed to puff a little smoke up Elon’s butt – because he’s hoping to be able to include Tesla-charging access to Aptera from the get go (at a better price than the public subscription rate.)

      But the plain fact is, unless Tesla reneges on its public subscription offer, Aptera owners will be able to use Tesla chargers for what will likely be a $9.95 annual subscription fee paid for by Aptera for the first five years that is ‘offered’ free to new Aptera buyers. That’s almost the worst case for access.

      The Tesla minions will be less concerned with Aptera owners because they are so ‘efficient’ the average charging session to boost range by 100 miles takes just over ten minutes. I mean who wants to sit at a charging station longer than that 🙂

      Additionally, for level 2 and level 3 CCS charging stations, it only takes a Tesla plug adapter to make those compatible … assuming the third-party service is operating.

      The point is that the Tesla plug is among those ‘tech’ innovations Musk has (Like the Mercedes-Benz patents on passenger compartments and crush zones) donated the patent rights to the public domain.

      A key reason no other manufacturer used it is because none were willing to pay Tesla the price they were asking for access to the Supercharger network. One reason was because the major manufacturers were likely concerned they might inadvertently share some data to Tesla if they participated.

      That fact – cost and forced data/customer sharing (they would have proprietary use of your credit card info and more on every supercharger customer) and while American consumers are largely uninterested, Detroit doesn’t want their customers to have that close a relationship with Tesla.)

      For Aptera, though, the use of the Tesla supercharger network – especially given how rarely it needs to be used – is a huge benefit.

      As to why this choice has not been formally announced, you can look at marketing as well.

      Musk wants Aptera (I opine) to use the Tesla Plug an announce it as such under the public subscription terms Tesla has already announced. Aptera will still have to pay for the plug but they won’t have to pay a royalty for it and all Aptera owners can have access to the supercharger network under the Tesla to consumer subscription offer but will have to pay the higher non-Tesla rates just like folks with their F-150 Lightening’s and an adapter.

      Of course, Aptera wants Musk to announce that there is an agreement between Tesla’s SC network and Aptera on more favorable terms than Tesla’s open subscription service.

      Ideally, Aptera will pony up something like $100,000 upfront that would prepay five years of registration on the Tesla supercharger network on every new Aptera. (Owners would be responsible for any power charges incurred.) It would require that new owners register (free) and and provide credit card info. Aptera’s initial payment would include the first 25,000 registrations and Aptera would pay $25/per vehicle (half Tesla’s subscription price) for Supercharger Access for the next 25,000 vehicles.

      While I have a level 2 charger with the J1772 plug, I’m resigned to the fact that Aptera will have a Tesla plug and IMHO, we’re all just waiting for the shoe to drop.

  • Andrew McKeown-Henshall

    Member
    August 24, 2022 at 8:47 am

    Given they want to sell world-wide and (US) tesla connector is an anomaly (even if it has some advantages) it would seem short-sighted to get too hung up on it… unless you plan to only produce for US market and think (probably wrongly) that the Tesla (US) plug design won’t change in the coming years and decades.

    • Jeffrey May

      Member
      August 25, 2022 at 10:58 am

      If Aptera is determined to locate the charge port behind the license plate, the Tesla plug might be the only DCFC option that’s small enough to fit in that location.

    • Joshua Rosen

      Member
      August 25, 2022 at 11:42 am

      The CCS2 connector is completely different than the CCS1 connector. When they go overseas they’ll have to switch connectors anyway. In North America the CCS1 network is an unreliable mess, Tesla has the only network that just works. That’s not the case in Europe, the public networks are in much better shape than they are in the US and Canada.

      Out of Spec Motoring does really good reviews, they just did a long video on the state of EV charging in the US.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnar6YZrn4Yhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnar6YZrn4Y

      • Curtis Cibinel

        Member
        August 25, 2022 at 12:05 pm

        Anecdotally it seems like CCS networks in canada seem to have less maintenance issues.

        Localization for europe will need a different charge port location (potentially behind the B pillar) since the CCS2 plug is way to big to go behind the plate. This will require some changes. Right hand drive or (if needed) width changes will also be an expensive localizations.

        • Joshua Rosen

          Member
          August 25, 2022 at 12:51 pm

          The width, and maybe the total size, sounds like the hard problem. Moving the charge port, or maybe just putting a little hump around the existing location should be fairly trivial in comparison.

          As an aside, maybe outsourcing EU homologation and manufacturing to Elaphe could speed up an EU rollout. Elaphe is already intimately familiar with the drivetrain, after all it’s theirs, and they are in a better position to judge what’s needed for the EU market than Aptera in San Diego is.

          • Mark Salyzyn

            Member
            August 25, 2022 at 1:07 pm

            @Joshua Rosen Elaphe knows how to take 350vdc battery and manage the motors with their inverters. However, charging and their batteries, especially with the mix from solar cells, is probably uniquely Aptera Motors IP? Could be a joint effort, in that Elaphe has provided some engineering advice and/or electronics?

            @Curtis Cibinel Doesn’t the CCS plug fit behind the plate if it is sideways?

            • Curtis Cibinel

              Member
              August 25, 2022 at 1:16 pm

              I doubt Elaphe is in a position to manufacture in europe; not their expertise.

              No idea if they could put CCS2 sideways; it would seem to be possible and would minimize other changes. That would definitely be even more clunky to work with and could potentially be a safety issue if raining; not sure.

            • Andrew McKeown-Henshall

              Member
              August 25, 2022 at 3:38 pm

              The license plate area would require mods for EU / UK anyway – our plates are wider and not as tall (if they allow standard plates) or almost square if they insist on 2 line, motorbike style plates

              I worked out the minimum plate size for a standard (non vanity) Reg earlier – it was something like 450mm x 110mm without country logo

            • Lane Costilow

              Member
              August 25, 2022 at 5:09 pm

              I was thinking about the other day, and decided I would just bend the plate if I need to.

            • Carl Knapp Knapp

              Member
              August 28, 2022 at 10:18 am

              On the Aiways U5 EV the front CCS charging port is mounted sideways.

  • Rupert Jung

    Member
    August 26, 2022 at 6:05 am

    What really sucks, having the port on the backside instead of the front.

    • Mark Salyzyn

      Member
      August 26, 2022 at 6:56 am

      Great visibility, cameras and all, reverse in?

      For some strange reason, there seems to be fewer cars with gas tank on the left hand side, at least in the lines at the gas station. I am balanced evenly driving up to left tank line, right tank line and pulling hose over, and reversing in right tank line should the hose not look like it could be pulled over. I know you want more convenience in your Aptera, but if a century of gasoline cars did not make it more convenient, I am not holding my breath that EVs will fare any better.

      On Aptera, the charger bezel is positioned leftword, and is also angled towards the left. Since the CCS connector option can be located on its side behind the motorcycle sized plate, and will undoubtedly be positioned in the angled bezel for entry from the left, I expect that the left side to charger is going to be the normal. The Tesla connector option might also be on its side too, IDK, it can go either way. So the question you have to ask is can the charge cable reach around to the back? For the CCS options it can, the cables are generally much longer, and I have seen several setup on the side, not in the front, which will work just fine. For the Tesla option it won’t, the superchargers are notorious for having short cables, and superchargers are all set up for drive in front.

      You will be backing into the Tesla Stall, are you ready?

      • Dennis Swaney

        Member
        August 27, 2022 at 11:39 am

        Asian built cars usually have theirs on the left side while European built cars usually have theirs on the right (US built are schizophrenic: left, right, center, wherever the designer decides). The charge ports on hybrids are usually on the opposite side from the fuel port so with the EVs, the manufacturers will probably just use the same side as the hybrid model.

      • Gordon Niessen

        Member
        August 27, 2022 at 7:59 pm

        There really is little difference to backing into a charger or driving forward in. The same charger can support both. And maybe the Aptera is easy to backup. Good visibility and pivoting on a single wheel.

  • Rupert Jung

    Member
    August 28, 2022 at 7:02 am

    I just hope they’ll move the charging port to the front for the CCS/EU version so I don’t have to drive backwards into each charging port and not being to reach the trunk afterwards.

    Even better would be an option for wireless charging or a ‘charging port’ to drive your vehicle into at home (wheel-stopper + connector at the front). 🙂

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Rupert Jung.
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