AWD vs FWD battery usage.

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions AWD vs FWD battery usage.

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions AWD vs FWD battery usage.

  • AWD vs FWD battery usage.

     Joshua Rosen updated 3 months, 1 week ago 10 Members · 15 Posts
  • Vernon Michael Gardner

    Member
    March 16, 2022 at 1:52 pm

    I am curious as to AWD and FWD miles per charge in the city and on the highway? I know which is faster, but does it use more energy in all circumstances? or is there a time when the AWD is more efficient than the FWD?

  • Len Nowak Nowak

    Moderator
    March 16, 2022 at 1:58 pm

    Search in this forum for the FAQ Spreadsheet as it has over 400 answers and you can search through those answers, direct from Aptera

    When this was answered a long time ago they said to figure about 10% range lost.Again everything has to be validation as they head to production.

    I hope that helps

    • Vernon Michael Gardner

      Member
      March 16, 2022 at 2:02 pm

      Leonard, thank you, I did a search, but with the information you provided I may of made the search to narrow. I will search with wider parameters. Thank you again.

    • John Trotter

      Member
      March 18, 2022 at 8:51 am

      I continue to think the 10% penalty for AWD is far too conservative. I don’t see air resistance being much different for a higher body, unlike with a flat-bottom vehicle with an uneven underside. Weight effect, yeah, but that’s minor. Look at motor matchup.com. https://www.motormatchup.com/efficiency?id=6140f1975683bd7cdc94f559

      The power difference at 60mph between a 60kWh AWD and FWD is less than 2% by their (theoretical) model.

      • Arlen Bell

        Member
        March 23, 2022 at 10:06 am

        I’ve selected the AWD, but have been weighing the two options and one thing that hasn’t been discussed is regenerative braking with the rear motor. It would be interesting to see testing of two identical Aptera’s – one with AWD and the other FWD.

  • Arthur MICHELSON

    Member
    March 17, 2022 at 10:46 am

    New to the discussions, so not sure where to post my question, but this seems as good a place as any: I’m deciding on AWD vs FWD and interested in the pros and cons. Pro for the AWD is it’s faster, and gets better traction, Con is it’s more expensive and apparently results in some range degradation. Any others? I live in snowless California, so is the traction issue an issue? Thanks for any feedback.

    • Joshua Rosen

      Member
      March 17, 2022 at 11:14 am

      I’ve reserved an AWD version but I live in New England and would never consider a 2WD car if AWD was available. If I lived in California like you I’d pick the FWD variant. The FWD is more than quick enough and you’ll get better range.

    • Curtis Cibinel

      Member
      March 17, 2022 at 12:24 pm

      I see Aptera as my midlife crisis sports car so the AWD option is basically just for the fun factor; useful in winter but I could get by without. I really feel they are ignoring the roadster / sports car marketing angle. Cost to performance ratio is amazing.

      • IA -1

        Member
        March 17, 2022 at 1:34 pm

        Curtis, that’s exactly my point of view for choosing the AWD. The upgrade cost from FWD to AWD is minimal taking in consideration the performance gain. I live in NJ, and I am completely fine with my FWD car, but the performance gain for the Aptera’s AWD is great, and the upgrade cost is not very big. I’m also fine with losing 10% of the range, since my daily commute is about 6 miles, the solar charge would take care of that. Having a 3.5 second car (to 60 mph) for this price is amazing.

      • Joshua Rosen

        Member
        March 17, 2022 at 1:53 pm

        What’s your idea of what a sports car or a roadster is supposed to be? For me it’s nimble handling, I want it to be fun driving on mountain roads in Vermont. Speed and acceleration is irrelevant in that application, on the mountain I won’t be going faster than 40MPH. I’m getting AWD because I don’t want to get stuck in the snow and I want to be able to use all season tires all year long because changing tires is a pain. I don’t care about the extra acceleration, I get dizzy if I floor my AWD Tesla and that’s a second slower than the AWD Aptera, I drive with a very light foot.

        This isn’t a race car, it’s top speed is only 110MPH so I doubt anyone will be taking them to a dragstrip. But classic roadsters were never about speed, they were always about handling.

        • Curtis Cibinel

          Member
          March 17, 2022 at 2:06 pm

          With the suspension work and width I expect handling to be excellent. I would consider a slingshot also a sports car and Aptera with traction control and wide stance should handle great. Moost test results show it is nimble.

          On a dragstrip the car will actually do very well since the max speed isnt really that important but not really my intent.

        • Dean McManis

          Member
          March 26, 2022 at 12:16 pm

          My idea of a sports car is offering superior performance in handling, acceleration and braking. I will be most likely taking my AWD Aptera to a drag strip and autocross course within a few months from new. Top speed is the least valuable, useful, or legal feature of a performance/sports car. And having a lightweight car with the Aptera’s proposed performance will be a key selling point for some buyers, as it has been for Tesla and others.

  • MidnightPilot .

    Member
    March 26, 2022 at 2:54 am

    So, why not have a switchable rear motor?

    On for acceleration and regenerative braking and off for cruise?

    Maybe a performance vs economy mode?

    • John Trotter

      Member
      March 26, 2022 at 12:14 pm

      Or, cruise with ONLY the rear drive? Actually, the management system may do that on its own. For example, in my Tesla, the front motor hardly ever is needed and the shift is handled automatically.

      • Joshua Rosen

        Member
        March 26, 2022 at 7:08 pm

        The front motor in a Tesla is an induction motor, the rear is permanent magnet. The Elaphe motors in the Aptera are all permanent magnet. It’s easier to disengage an induction motor than a permanent magnet motor which is why Tesla chose to put an induction motor in the front, it allows them to operate as rear wheel drive most of the time and only engage the front motor when necessary.

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