Gas could have paid for Aptera

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Gas could have paid for Aptera

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Gas could have paid for Aptera

  • Gas could have paid for Aptera

  • Lord Chad Dunham

    Member
    December 25, 2021 at 7:31 am

    I have been tracking my gas mileage since I’ve had s smart phone. The following statistics are not complete as not every visit to a gas pump was recorded. But, I’ve been thinking about this after looking at the total spent on fuel. The data I’ve tracked is covering 2 vehicles.

    1) 2011 GMC Sierra

    Owned: 5/11 – Present, 335 Fuel Logs, 6561 Gallons, 112,428 Miles Driven (Total from first to last fill up), $19224, Average MPG 16.0, $0.17 per mile (Side note: the impala has sat for approximately 1 year at various times due to needing repairs)

    2) 2004 Chevy Impala

    Owned 12/12 – 12/21, 246 Fuel Logs, 3049 Gallons, 83,821 Miles Driven (Total from first to last fill up), $8650, Average MPG 27.2, $.10 per mile

    Totals) 9610 Gallons Burned, 196,249 Miles Driven, $27,874 Spent in fuel, Average MPG for both vehicles 20.4, $0.14 per mile

  • Ray Holan

    Moderator
    December 25, 2021 at 8:23 am

    Nice record keeping there, Chad! My own fuel consumption records are much sloppier.

  • Scott Price

    Member
    December 25, 2021 at 8:25 am

    Good info, Chad. Also keep in mind that your maintenance, repair, and replacement parts costs will likely be much lower in the Aptera (as with other EVs) than a typical ICE car. Another ROI bonus!

    • Lord Chad Dunham

      Member
      December 25, 2021 at 9:19 am

      That is something else I’ve thought of. I still have all of the documents and receipts from all repairs. But those are not organized on my phone. I could have used the same app for that, just never entered I. Those maintenance repairs and oil changes. Probably could tack on another $10,000 for all of that.

  • John Malcom

    Member
    December 27, 2021 at 3:27 pm

    An eye opener for the rest of us that are still driving ICE vehicles. Applicable to us over some period of time (Gas pay off of an Aptera) Certainly frightening when thought of in the context of environmental impact

    • Lord Chad Dunham

      Member
      December 27, 2021 at 3:33 pm

      I never considered the big picture of how much I was a slave to the oil companies before.

      Sadly that is just the gasoline cost. That does not include the amount of money given to the stations for drinks and snacks.

      As a home inspector, I sometimes stop and think “for me to buy X I have to do # inspections to pay for that. I have been thinking about money very differently lately. It helps with the appreciation of what Aptera is trying to accomplish.

      • kerbe2705

        Member
        December 27, 2021 at 9:20 pm

        Don’t forget oil changes!

  • Lord Chad Dunham

    Member
    May 5, 2022 at 2:31 pm

    So I had to get a new sticker for my truck today. I asked a couple questions about tags for EVs. The lady told me not to get one because the tags are “a lot more”. EV tag renewals are $251 compared to the $164 I paid today.

    The amount of money I’ll be saving in fuel costs can easily justify that $87 difference. It just goes to show the greedy IL government will find a way to tax us.

    • John Malcom

      Member
      May 5, 2022 at 2:50 pm

      Not just in IL. Every state is jumping on the EV fee bandwagon with the reason (Excuse) we have to pay our share for road maintenance since the state or local governments do not get gas tax revenue from us.

      • kerbe2705

        Member
        May 5, 2022 at 3:44 pm

        @John Malcom The BIG truth is that drivers in the US don’t pay gas tax – it’s paid by the distributor who then increases the per-gallon cost to the retailer who then increases the per-gallon cost to the consumer. ICE vehicles aren’t directly taxed for road maintenance, but EVs are: If I buy an EV and you buy an ICE and then we lock them in a barn and don’t drive them, you pay NOTHING toward road maintenance and I pay $$ because my EV is directly taxed.

        • John Malcom

          Member
          May 6, 2022 at 8:06 pm

          Tks for the information. Didn’t know that

    • Alain Chuzel

      Member
      May 5, 2022 at 2:55 pm

      I think it’s perfectly reasonable for EV users to be “charged” differently for road maintenance? (Do you see what I did there?)

    • Peter Jorgensen

      Member
      May 5, 2022 at 3:21 pm

      In utah there’s a $120 EV “Tax” tacked onto the registration.

      It’s still cheaper to sell your ICE vehicle right now and buy/lease a new or used EV until you get an aptera if you drive more than about 12000 miles a year.

    • Christopher Brisbois

      Member
      May 5, 2022 at 3:25 pm

      Lived in the Land of Lincoln for the majority of my life so I can relate. The great state of Arizonia is now getting in on the action as well. If I could plate an Aptera today, it would cost me ~$16 for a tag. Next year, the same vehicle will cost ~$550 (all numbers are approximate as I don’t have the exact formula sitting in front of me). One thing is certain, if there’s a dollar to be had somehow the govt will find a way to try and wrest it from my hand.

      ***Note, I’ll gladly pay the inflated registration fee for a vehicle that gets me off of the ICE addiction

  • Russell Fauver

    Member
    May 6, 2022 at 4:20 am

    Last summer I was messing around inside the charger of my Force and let the smoke out. Took a month for the new one to arrive. Had to drive my pickup while I waited. $250 for gas for that month ~shudder~ Plus it was gross grabbing a public fuel nozzle.

  • Patrick Liebknecht

    Member
    May 6, 2022 at 7:51 pm

    Gas tax goes toward highway repairs etc.

    when kalifornia realized they were losing so much money when 3% of their residents switched to EVs they came up with a mileage tax and other assorted fees https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1109824_even-california-imposes-new-fee-on-electric-cars-in-lieu-of-gas-taxes

    Where do you think the states are going to get revenue from ? ( that they lose from people charging not fueling )

  • David Marlow

    Member
    May 6, 2022 at 8:36 pm

    I purchase my Volt 11 years ago, it cost twice as much as the comparable and I was barely able to afford it at the time, but has been worth the money sense I have had it. The savings on gas and maintenance has more than made up the difference. Now with its age it has a few quirks, but has never failed to get me where I want to go.

    I am sure the Aptera will be even better and at a lower cost.

  • Patrick Liebknecht

    Member
    May 7, 2022 at 5:34 pm

    I’ve been searching for a used crosstrek hybrid , the ones up for sale are 8 to 10 years old , Subaru and 99% of hybrid manufacturers warranty the batteries for 8 years or 100k miles , I’ve talked to the dealers asked them about the warranty ask about the cost to replace the batteries , since I’m still driving my Volvo , you can only guess what the answers were , most of the time. No response at all, other times completely unaffordable prices ( between $3000-8000 ) dollars

    Any fuel savings will be eaten by the cost of a failed battery pack.

    Used EVs are ticking timebombs when it comes to the battery pack.

    • Dennis Swaney

      Member
      May 8, 2022 at 7:53 am

      There are several aftermarket Hybrid battery replacement companies out there. Greentecauto, green bean, hybrids2go, etc. You might want to contact them to see if they do Subie Hybrids.

    • kerbe2705

      Member
      May 8, 2022 at 8:23 am

      @Patrick Liebknecht First, the early Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid used Nickel Metal Hydride batteries, not Lithium Ion batteries. Newer Subaru Hybrids use Lithium Ion packs and have an 8-year, 160K mile warranty.

      There have been Teslas on the road for a full decade and even the earliest models are still going strong, many with multiple hundreds of miles on them, AND they still retain value in the used vehicle marketplace.

      Your fears of “ticking time bombs” are unfounded: Modern Lithium Ion battery packs – unless they are severely damaged or were incorrectly manufactured to begin with simply do not “fail”.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  kerbe2705.
      • Dennis Swaney

        Member
        May 8, 2022 at 10:10 am

        “Your fears of “ticking time bombs” are unfounded: Modern Lithium Ion battery packs – unless they are severely damaged or were incorrectly manufactured to begin with simply do not “fail”.”

        I’m guessing you mean those used in EVs as I’ve had 3 Li-Ion batteries fail in personal electronics: watch, phone, & laptop. The first two required purchase of new devices, while I was able to replace the battery in the laptop.

    • Peter Jorgensen

      Member
      May 9, 2022 at 7:04 am

      Every generation newer on EVs seems to be better in terms of battery life.

      Ie: Tesla model S and X (18650 cells) are worse than model 3/Y (2170 cells).

      Kia Soul is worse than Niro and Kona.

      Etc…

      Basically just don’t buy an old leaf with no thermal cooling system.

  • Patrick Liebknecht

    Member
    May 10, 2022 at 12:33 pm

    Fail is rather harsh yes.

    Fail to hold a full charge over time is more like it , like any lithium battery powered item, they degrade. If they didn’t there would be NO NEED to warranty them ,

    What they are telling you is. You get 8-10 years after that you’re on your own and when you think you can 120miles on a charge and now you can only go 60 or 70 , no it didn’t fail , but now you’re charging 2x as much and if you want your full capacity back and range. Well. Cough up 3-8k dollars

    • Oz (It’s Oz, just Oz)

      Member
      May 10, 2022 at 5:21 pm

      In 8-10 years, advances in technology, and in an ideal world, mass production costs, will hopefully give you a battery pack that will be half the size, half the price, and twice the range

      • Curtis Cibinel

        Member
        May 10, 2022 at 6:15 pm

        Predicting rapidly evolving technology and economics is hard but transitions take time.

        Demand wont allow prices to drop. We would be lucky to stay equal as the demand is already “ridiculous”. Maybe in 15 years when everything is battery, and recycling is ramped up are producing enough we will see prices drop.

        Technically the only likely path to 1/2 the size and 2x the range (4x density improvement) is mature solid state technology. Again this will likely take even longer since once the technology exists displacing established battery technologies takes time (starting with the extreme high end). Incidentally this level of battery density would also allow for domestic flights to switch to batteries adding even more demand for the emerging technology.

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