Last Year for Lamborghini Full Combustion

Aptera Community Solar EV Industry News Last Year for Lamborghini Full Combustion

Aptera Community Solar EV Industry News Last Year for Lamborghini Full Combustion

  • Last Year for Lamborghini Full Combustion

  • John Malcom

    Member
    January 23, 2022 at 9:28 am

    Perhaps the death nail for ICE super cars on the way? Lamborghini will not make/sell ICE only cars after this year.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-23/lamborghini-to-bid-farewell-to-pure-combustion-cars-this-year?srnd=premium

    • This discussion was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  bbelcamino.
  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    January 23, 2022 at 12:38 pm

    Supercars are the one place where I would think that the ICE would survive, precisely because they are so complex and impractical. Supercars are sold in such small numbers that they have no effect on the environment, they could be burning coal and it wouldn’t matter. What they have is an incredible amount of mechanical complexity. That’s a terrible thing in an ordinary car but it’s a selling point for a collectable.

    The Swiss watch industry is pretty healthy today. They nearly died 50 years ago when the digital watch was introduced, a $10 plastic watch was more accurate than any mechanical watch could hope to be no matter what the cost. Today the watch function on your phone is free and about a billion times more accurate than needed for ordinary use because it comes from the atomic clocks on GPS satellites which are synced from the better atomic clocks in Boulder CO which in turn are comparing notes with every other atomic clock in the world. But that doesn’t stop people from buying $10K Rolexes or $200K Patek Phillippes or much more for one of a kind hand crafted watches. What makes those watches so appealing isn’t time keeping, which is pants as the Brits would say, but that they are beautiful mechanical wonders, the very epitome of 19th century technology.

    V12 twin turboed internal combustion engines fall into the same category. They can’t compete on a performance level with EVs today let alone what EVs will be capable of in the future. But if you open the hood of an EV all you see is a frunk, but under the hood or the rear panel of Ferrari or Lamborghini there is this massive collection of aluminum, steel, hoses and ducts. In the future my prediction is that instead of going away they will just get more expensive and more complex. The entry and mid level ICE performance cars will disappear, but the high end will remain.

    • John Malcom

      Member
      January 23, 2022 at 6:30 pm

      I have a 2004 Lamborghini Diablo with its requisite V12. Bought used with low miles in 2009. It sits in the garage next to my Tesla Model 3. When I bought it, it sat next to my Nissan Leaf. A little like Dr. Jeckle and Mr. Hyde.

      It is driven once a month on a weekend now. It is a repair and maintenance nightmare. Scheduled service is $7,000 at the dealer I use. A function of your stated complexity and expensive parts that can come from Lamborghini only most of the time. There is no question that it is a thrill to drive. As much as I look forward to driving my Aptera, The Aptera will not come close to the feeling of driving the Diablo from one corner gas station to the gas station on the next corner, About 8 -10 miles to the premium gallon around town. It is not an easy car to drive very stiff clutch, slotted shifter, very responsive steering. If you are not careful and overdrive it, it can get away from you on corners, curves, and sometimes on a straightaway. And of course there is the exhaust sound and the sound of the air intake right behind your head. Mesmerizing.

      Do you blame people for wanting to keep that driving experience around? Sure a Tesla Plaid will out perform it now, but not come even close to the driving experience. I had it when I lived in Park City UT and nothing could touch it on the 189 down to Sundance. (Except in the snow of course😖)

      But they will go away just like the dinosaur they are. Probably with my children’s generation for sure grandchildren’s generation. What will be “Cool” for them will be the name plate with a completely different configuration.

      And that’s as it should be.

      • Joshua Rosen

        Member
        January 23, 2022 at 8:06 pm

        You’ll want to find a way to keep that car in the family, your great grand children will think it’s the coolest thing ever. There is a forty year period between the time a technology goes obsolete and the time it’s revived as retro cool. You can see this with audio equipment, when the CD replaced the LP in the early 80s everyone was happy to see the LP go, they were bulky and had to be treated with kid gloves and even so they were inevitably scratched. Now there is a generation that was born decades after LPs went away that are collecting LPs and reviving old turntables. When I was in my late 20s I did the same thing, I bought an Edison cylinder player and a couple of Victrola’s. When I bought them my father’s reaction was to ask why I’d want those things, he said he threw out his 1948 when Hi-FI was invented.

        In 40 years gasoline will be a specialty item that will be made by a small refiner specifically for the use of collector car owners so it will be possible to run the car. It will be like photographic film, Ektachome was revived last year because there is a demand from a small group of people who are interested in analog photography. The LPs that I was talking about are also being made again, record pressing equipment from the 1960s has been restored and is being used again.

        • This reply was modified 10 months, 1 week ago by  Joshua Rosen.
        • This reply was modified 10 months, 1 week ago by  Joshua Rosen.
        • John Malcom

          Member
          January 23, 2022 at 8:23 pm

          Ha Ha Every body in the family except my wife wants it. Even the bleeding heart environmentalists. They are such hypocrites. My wife is PRC Chinese, 5’1″, and 98 pounds. She is too short/small to drive it. She would like to see it gone. It will probably go to my first born son if he survives the military

          • Joshua Rosen

            Member
            January 24, 2022 at 7:31 am

            I wouldn’t say the ability to do math makes one a hypocrite. What comes out of the tail pipes of a hundred million cars matters, what comes out of the tail pipes of a few thousand cars doesn’t especially cars that are only driven a few thousand miles a year. Just curious, how many miles are on the odometer of your Lambo? If that was an 18 year old conventional car it would be around 200,000, I’d wager that your Lambo is 10% of that.

            • John Malcom

              Member
              January 24, 2022 at 8:41 am

              Close 32,000. And your right significantly less than had it been a regular ICE

            • V Pilot

              Member
              January 24, 2022 at 6:48 pm

              That’s close to what’s on my ’88 Jag XJS coupe

            • Vernon Michael Gardner

              Member
              January 24, 2022 at 10:21 pm

              I love all those old ICE vehicles. I will not miss the old leaks, drive belts in strange locations, removing brake boosters and masters to get to valve covers for a shim adjustment, tracing the injector drivers because the fuel injector was replaced without diagnosis.

              I really miss my 1985 Toyota Corolla GTS lift back, easy to work on, but still had cap and rotor and only one ignition coil and had a 7,500 red line. But I digress.

              I think in 10-20 years we will be saying something similar about the early electric motors and electronics.

              PS. My 944 leaked like a civ, but it was so much fun to drive at high speeds.

            • John Malcom

              Member
              January 25, 2022 at 12:08 pm

              OOh…I hope you kept the 944.

            • Vernon Michael Gardner

              Member
              January 25, 2022 at 10:42 pm

              I sold the 944 and my two RX7 race cars when I changed careers from driving to building cars. I found I really enjoyed the challenge of diagnosing emissions related systems. Have to laugh because that career only has a few years left in it before it’s gone.

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