Wireless Charging: Game Changer of the Day

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Wireless Charging: Game Changer of the Day

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Wireless Charging: Game Changer of the Day

  • Wireless Charging: Game Changer of the Day

  • Philip Sandiford

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 9:42 am

    I didn’t know Korean G-60s already have wireless charging. Huh https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/09/whats-the-state-of-wireless-ev-charging/

  • Vernon Sinnott

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 9:53 am
    • Philip Sandiford

      Member
      September 15, 2022 at 9:57 am

      Thanks Vernon! [deleted]

    • George Hughes

      Member
      September 15, 2022 at 12:57 pm

      Induction charging occurs when electricity is run through a wire – often a coil – and creating a magnetic field around the wire induces a current in a similar wire coil placed in proximity to the first in the vehicle.

      Inductive charging is quite possible for the Aptera – that is a matter of physics. Still, I don’t think it is likely or conceptually viable for the Aptera.

      There are two factors that work against it being a mainstream thing for Aptera.

      First, its early adoption for charging busses and even cars in garages, is based on the flat underbody which is like 99.9 percent of the EVs made so far from cars to buses. Aptera is the outlier because of its dolphin shape and aerodynamics. Fitting an induction plate to the belly of the Aptera would ruin the aerodynamics.

      Second, an induction charger, while it has no moving parts, is basically a stationary object, often placed in one’s garage and over which those with compatible EVs much park precisely upon to make a viable connection. This is the opposite of the needs for Aptera which needs to be able to park to maximize the solar inputs.

      The difference, of course, is solar provides free energy while the induction charging pad requires you pay for electricity (unless you’ve attached it to a fixed solar array or otherwise power the device with renewables.)

      Like many, the idea of contactless charging of EVs through induction seems like a great idea. Heck, we have hundreds of thousands of miles of high-voltage transmission lines that, someone will observe, could be removed from their structures and buried … in a road … that would create a robust magnetic field in the road in which it is buried. How much loss to the current would occur from vehicles driving over the EMF?

      The power in the transmission lines may be so great that the resulting magnetic field so intense that people and animals could be negatively impacted by the waves (think pacemakers going ‘pop’ and, if power is too intense, cells may mutate some imagine.)

      But if the absolutely necessary EMF is present and in proximity to devices like the coiled induction charging pads, they would ‘generate’ electricity in the coil on the vehicle.

      The EMF may also impede the progress of the vehicle in motion although there are several demonstrations where EVs have been successfully charged while in motion.

      Rationalizing and maximizing the investments we make in infrastructure through greater coordination is, or ought to be a first principle.

      For instance, there is a plan – it is on the trash heap now – that called for a western toll road bypass of the ATL region that followed the broad right-of-way already established by high power transmission lines. It would seem, at least based on the idea that vehicles drawing a charge off the EMF surrounding the transmission line, that if the impact of the vehicles on HV transmission rates, one might consider burying the cables and creating a 70-mile road designed to charge semis on the move.

      And as the currents running through the lines likely range from 1-11kv, the difference between Aptera’s belly pan and the road would be insignificant in that context and it would be able to receive more than 100 watts continuously as it traveled down this highway meaning it is not only powering the Aptera but charging as it drives.

      The question is not whether high voltage transmission lines create high power EMF’s; they do. Nor is the question whether roads can be constructed that can charge an EV while in motion through induction; they can. The question is how much energy is tapped, sapped and lost in the HV transmission lines by the process and whether it makes sense to combine these distinct infrastructure projects and whether that combination is worth it on a specific stretch of highway.

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 10:27 am

    I don’t see how this would survive the first snow storm, the snow plow would destroy it.

  • Curtis Cibinel

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 11:19 am

    Wireless results in substancial wasted energy.

    If we need to be lazy a robotic plug butler could potentially be far more cost effective (1 per 20+ stalls). Looking at some of the one off things stuff made here and other YouTube engineers have pulled off this would seem relatively easy by comparison. We don’t need the tesla bot for it or a snake charger.

  • BRUCE MENGLER

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 11:33 am

    Wireless charging is a wasteful gimmick especially for the Aptera.
    I plan on driving my new Aptera for a full 365 consecutive days WITHOUT ever plugging it into the grid.

    Aptera will be delivered with free wireless charging with every vehicle (from the Sun)!

  • David Marlow

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 1:31 pm

    Michigan already has 1 mile of wireless charging installed on a public road on a test basis. There are plans to extend this. Some other is installed on a closed test loop.

  • Philip Sandiford

    Member
    September 15, 2022 at 1:56 pm

    Negatives noted. I am not suggesting Aptera use it: I found the [claimed] efficiency pretty interesting, and the fact that the SAE standard is in use in Korea on the G60 is worth following.

    These “game changing” technologies hit the headlines every week like good clickbait does. I was somewhat taken back that it is in commercial use on a passenger vehicle.

    • Matthew Crawford

      Member
      September 23, 2022 at 5:02 pm

      It may be several years out, but imagine if in a decade or 2 from now they have wireless charging parking spots at most strip malls. You could park your Aptera, have it top off, then start feeding power back into the grid. Aptera could even work out a deal where we would have an account with the wireless charging company and we would get the initial top off as a tab with a discounted rate that is repaid by the car feeding back into the grid. We could even get paid for any extra electricity our car generates over what was used to top it off. Such a deal shouldn’t be too difficult since the cars would be helping the charging company generate power for the other cars, saving them money as well.

      This may be wishful thinking, but I love the idea of all of us helping deal with overloaded power grids. while earning a little bit of money from the extra charging that would be otherwise wasted when the Aptera is fully charged.

  • Vernon Sinnott

    Member
    September 24, 2022 at 6:08 am

    The buses in Winachee still recharge through 10″ of snow. Solar cells can also charge through snow.

  • Rupert Jung

    Member
    September 25, 2022 at 6:48 am

    I would LOVE to have a wireless option for Altera. As they just HAD to place the charging plug at the worst position possible (backside) there is no way for a ‘charging dock’ with connecters at the front anymore (wheel stoppers + connector).

    Instead of having to navigate backwards for charging each time, wireless would be a great option!

    • LoveAptera YokeDealbreaker

      Member
      September 28, 2022 at 4:47 am

      Tesla has the charging port at the rear. Drivers easily back into their spots with the camera display on the 17″ screen. This makes it easy to look for traffic before pulling out, and I expect a quality reverse camera on Aptera as well.

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    September 25, 2022 at 7:00 am

    Wireless charging is something that sounds a lot better than it would really be. A standard wired EVSE is simple and easy to use and most importantly it’s robust. I don’t see how a wireless charger could survive the first snow storm, the snow plow will tear it apart. Even if it can be installed in a way where it would be flush with the pavement it would still be sitting in a pool of salt water all winter. Salt water isn’t good for electronic devices. At the end of the day the benefits are tiny, the cost is significant and the reliability is going to be awful.

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 2 hours ago by  Joshua Rosen.
    • LoveAptera YokeDealbreaker

      Member
      September 25, 2022 at 6:59 pm

      Well said, and I agree.

    • GLENN ZAJIC

      Member
      September 25, 2022 at 7:49 pm

      Joshua, wireless charging does not have to happen on public streets. A decade ago Qualcom had one called Halo, but I don’t know what happened to it. Anyway, several have been developed with just a rubber mat that would be on your garage floor. You just drive the vehicle to center over it, then a coil (inductor) picks up the charge from the mat. One issue with Aptera is that the best location for the receiver coil is low on the vehicle (close to the ground). But the Apteras’ aluminum belly probably would interfere with the pick-up of the transmitting mat. I do not know how much separation is required between the copper pick-up coil and a metal surface.

  • Philip Sandiford

    Member
    September 25, 2022 at 9:32 am

    Light reading so far: “common sense” says it is wasteful and problematic. Proponent funded studies say it is more efficient and simpler.

    I’m watching Korea and am grateful for their being the lab rat.

  • Philip Sandiford

    Member
    September 28, 2022 at 3:54 pm

    CA addresses induction charging after 14:18…

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gFnyBWEAwqc&feature=youtu.be

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